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Podcast: Cold Equations and Moral Hazard

Cory Doctorow - 2014, March 3 - 08:21

Here's a reading (MP3) of my latest Locus column, Cold Equations and Moral Hazard which considers the way that science fiction can manipulate our ideas about the technical necessity for human misery, and how that narrative can be hijacked for self-serving ends.

Apparently, editor John W. Campbell sent back three rewrites in which the pilot figured out how to save the girl. He was adamant that the universe must punish the girl.

The universe wasn’t punishing the girl, though. Godwin was – and so was Barton (albeit reluctantly).

The parameters of ‘‘The Cold Equations’’ are not the inescapable laws of physics. Zoom out beyond the page’s edges and you’ll find the author’s hands carefully arranging the scenery so that the plague, the world, the fuel, the girl and the pilot are all poised to inevitably lead to her execution. The author, not the girl, decided that there was no autopilot that could land the ship without the pilot. The author decided that the plague was fatal to all concerned, and that the vaccine needed to be delivered within a timeframe that could only be attained through the execution of the stowaway.

It is, then, a contrivance. A circumstance engineered for a justifiable murder. An elaborate shell game that makes the poor pilot – and the company he serves – into victims every bit as much as the dead girl is a victim, forced by circumstance and girlish naïveté to stain their souls with murder.

Moral hazard is the economist’s term for a rule that encourages people to behave badly. For example, a rule that says that you’re not liable for your factory’s pollution if you don’t know about it encourages factory owners to totally ignore their effluent pipes – it turns willful ignorance into a profitable strategy.

Mastering by John Taylor Williams: [email protected]

John Taylor Williams is a audiovisual and multimedia producer based in Washington, DC and the co-host of the Living Proof Brew Cast. Hear him wax poetic over a pint or two of beer by visiting livingproofbrewcast.com. In his free time he makes "Beer Jewelry" and "Odd Musical Furniture." He often "meditates while reading cookbooks."

MP3

Categories: Blogs

Cold Equations and Moral Hazard: science fiction considered harmful to the future

Cory Doctorow - 2014, March 2 - 23:35


My latest Locus column is "Cold Equations and Moral Hazard", an essay about the way that our narratives about the future can pave the way for bad people to create, and benefit from, disasters. "If being in a lifeboat gives you the power to make everyone else shut the hell up and listen (or else), then wouldn’t it be awfully convenient if our ship were to go down?"

Apparently, editor John W. Campbell sent back three rewrites in which the pilot figured out how to save the girl. He was adamant that the universe must punish the girl.

The universe wasn’t punishing the girl, though. Godwin was – and so was Barton (albeit reluctantly).

The parameters of ‘‘The Cold Equations’’ are not the inescapable laws of physics. Zoom out beyond the page’s edges and you’ll find the author’s hands carefully arranging the scenery so that the plague, the world, the fuel, the girl and the pilot are all poised to inevitably lead to her execution. The author, not the girl, decided that there was no autopilot that could land the ship without the pilot. The author decided that the plague was fatal to all concerned, and that the vaccine needed to be delivered within a timeframe that could only be attained through the execution of the stowaway.

It is, then, a contrivance. A circumstance engineered for a justifiable murder. An elaborate shell game that makes the poor pilot – and the company he serves – into victims every bit as much as the dead girl is a victim, forced by circumstance and girlish naïveté to stain their souls with murder.

Moral hazard is the economist’s term for a rule that encourages people to behave badly. For example, a rule that says that you’re not liable for your factory’s pollution if you don’t know about it encourages factory owners to totally ignore their effluent pipes – it turns willful ignorance into a profitable strategy.

Cold Equations and Moral Hazard

Categories: Blogs

Kakapo chick imminent?

Another Chance to See - 2014, March 2 - 18:12

Sirocco Kakapo (@Spokesbird) tweeted at 1:31 PM on Sun, Mar 02, 2014: Boom! Cheeping can be heard from inside Lisa's crushed-but-taped-up egg! Claws crossed for some good news today: (https://twitter.com/Spokesbird/status/440192597105971201)

--- Originally published at http://www.anotherchancetosee.com

Categories: Blogs

Kakapo chick hatched!

Another Chance to See - 2014, March 2 - 18:09

Sirocco Kakapo (@Spokesbird) tweeted at 7:43 PM on Sun, Mar 02, 2014:Skraaarrrk! I'm so very pleased to introduce you to the very first kākāpō chick of 2014: (https://twitter.com/Spokesbird/status/440286273073201152)
--- Originally published at http://www.anotherchancetosee.com

Categories: Blogs

2014 Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture

Another Chance to See - 2014, February 26 - 10:18

This year's lecture is March 11th at 7:30pm. For more information please visit this page at Save The Rhino: The Science of Harry Potter and the Mathematics of The SimpsonsThis year's lecture will explore a theme close to the hearts of many of Douglas' fans. We will be exploring science in fiction, taking a closer look at two popular fictional worlds - Harry Potter and the Simpsons - and exploring the science within.--- Originally published at http://www.anotherchancetosee.com

Categories: Blogs

Guest review: my daughter reviews Ariol

Cory Doctorow - 2014, February 26 - 08:33

I love reading with my daughter, Poesy, who has just turned six. We agree on almost all of her favorites, and re-reading them is one of our best-loved activities, and how we pass the time on boring bus-rides and so forth. However, there are a few books that Poesy loves, but which leave me cold. First among these is are the Ariol books, a long-running French kids' comic series that are being swiftly translated into English by Papercutz (there are three books out so far, and a fourth is due in May). Ariol was co-created by the amazing and talented Emmanuel Guibert, whose other work includes the anarcho-gonzo Sardine kids' comics; the brilliant WWI memoir Alan's War, and the extraordinary memoir of doctors in Soviet-occupied Afghanistan The Photographer.

I love Guibert, but not Ariol. Poesy, on the other hand, can't get enough of it. This is cool -- and better than cool, because my reluctance to read her these books over and over (and over and over) has actually driven her to be a much better independent reader, and she often picks up an Ariol book, sits herself down, and reads it to herself for hours, snickering. Ariol is like your kid's obnoxious friend who is so incredibly naughty that you dread his visits, and who your kid adores and wants to play with all the time (thankfully, he also lives in a comic book).

It's exciting to see Poesy developing her own taste, separate from ours, and I wanted to give her a chance to explain what she likes about Ariol. So we sat down in my office and recorded this video review together. If you've got little anarcho-readers in your household, Poesy wants you to know that you should let them read some Ariol books.

There's also a long-running French-Canadian Ariol cartoon, which has been dubbed into many languages. You can find tons on Youtube, including this English one.

Ariol #1: Just a Donkey Like You and Me

Ariol #2: Thunder Horse

Ariol #3: Happy as a Pig...

Ariol #4: A Beautiful Cow [forthcoming May 6, 2014]

Categories: Blogs

2014 season has begun!

Green City Acres - 2014, February 24 - 20:24

 

Here we go again. Even though we’ve got another blast of winter, that hasn’t stalled our enthusiasm to get this season off to a great start. Even though it’s cold outside, with the help of our vertical nursery system, we can start many of our crops early and summer season crops now, even when it’s below freezing outside.

Today we’ve got beets, tomatoes, kale, pac choi, basil, and peppers going. More to come tomorrow!

Categories: Blogs

Day + 145

Coal Trail - 2014, February 24 - 17:02

We were able to bring Bennett home from the hospital late last week.  Over the weekend, his symptoms improved and his stomach started to settle for the first time in a month.  He has also been very hungry and gaining energy every day.  
His immune system is still fighting off the adeno virus.  It remains in his blood at a viral load rate of 120,000.  Much lower than the previous 1.29 million.  But still very far from zero.  The doctors do remind us that when the virus is still in the blood system, it is still circulating/alive in all organ systems.  They did caution us saying that although Bennett appears healthy on the outside, virus symptoms could still appear weeks out from the original test.
In order to help Bennett's immune system fight off the virus there has been many steps taken.  His immuno-suppressive medications have all been stopped.  Certain anti-viral and anti-fungal medication doses have been halved.  His cyclosporin (anti-rejection medicine) is currently being tapered down.  They dramatically reduced it in half last week.  And continue to decrease the dose weekly.  They are hoping that this is what is causing the reduction in the viral number.  This is a bit risky as it could also cause Graft vs Host, but the doctors feel that GvH is a safer alternative that adeno moving into the respiratory system.
Bennett's immune system has also taken quite a hit.  It is functioning at a level lower than it was right after his transplant.  He still requires a special medication to boost up his blood count numbers.  Tomorrow he is due to receive immuno globulin.  We made it through transplant without ever needing this blood product that helps boost the immune system. We will also see where his blood counts are at tomorrow.
Thank you for the many well wishes this week...they have helped so much! 
Below is a video of Bennett and Lucie working with the music therapist at the hospital.  They were composing this song.





Categories: Blogs

Author Spotlight: Hugh Howey – Sword & Laser

Belmont - 2014, February 24 - 16:31

We’re back!!! Welcome back to the space castle, everybody! HUGE thanks to our Kickstarter supporters for making this possible. In our first episode of Season 2, we talk to Wool Omnibus author Hugh Howey. Find out how not to get shoved outside, how George R. R. Martin motivated Hugh’s career, and his number one editing tip.

Categories: Blogs

Text of Little Brother on an art-litho, tee, or tote

Cory Doctorow - 2014, February 23 - 23:25



As you may have noticed, I think Litographs are really cool: the company turns the text of various books into a piece of appropriately themed text-art and makes lithographs, tees and tote-bags out of it.

Now, I'm delighted to announce that the company has produced a line of Litographs based on my novel Little Brother, with a gorgeous anti-surveillance design by Benjy Brooke.


The Little Brother Litograph is available as a poster in three sizes, a tee (bearing the first 75,000 words of the book), and a tote (bearing 20,000 words).

Each piece is custom-made, and you can choose between a variety of color schemes or a black-and-white design. Tees are two-sided, screened from collar to hem, and come in both boy- and girl-cuts.

The company sends a new, high quality book to the International Book Bank for every poster they sell.


For this week only, you can get $5 off any Litograph product with the discount code M1k3y.

Little Brother

Categories: Blogs

Veronica Plays Octodad!

Belmont - 2014, February 23 - 12:31

In my new Let’s Play series on DiamondClub.tv, I play the amazingly frustrating and hilarious game Octodad: Dadliest Catch! Stay tuned for new episodes every Thursday, live at 4pm PT.

Follow me on Twitch!
Subscribe on YouTube!

Categories: Blogs

Museums and the free world: keynote from the Museums and the Web conference in Florence

Cory Doctorow - 2014, February 20 - 01:18


Yesterday, I delivered a keynote address for the 2014 Museums and the Web Conference in Florence, speaking in the audience chamber of the Palazzo Vecchio, which is pretty much the definition of working the big room at the palace. The organizers will be uploading video shortly, but in the meantime, they've been kind enough to post the crib for my talk, which is pretty extensive. The talk was called "GLAM (galleries, museums, archives and libraries) and the Free World":

* The information age is, in many ways, the beginning of history

* It’s a moment at which every person is swiftly becoming an archivist of her own life, a curator of billions of blips of ephemeral communications and ruminations and interactions

* As any archaeologist who’s ever rejoiced at finding a midden that reveals how normal people lived their lives in antiquity can tell you, this ephemera, so rare and badly preserved through most of our history, is of incalculable value

* Which would you rather see: an oil painting of a Victorian monarch, a ramrod stiff photo of your great-grandmother in her confirmation smock, or a hundred transcripts of the conversations she shared with her peers and her family?

* The tools by which we accomplish this archival business are, of course, computers

* Carried in our bags and pockets, worn in and on our bodies

* There is one group of people in the world who understand how archiving works, who understand the importance of the ephemeral en masse, who can steer us to personal and cultural practices of preservation, archiving, dissemination, and access — it’s you, the museum sector

* Just as librarians — who have toiled for centuries at the coalface of information and authority, systematizing the process of figuring out which sources to trust and why — are more needed than ever now, when we are all of us required to sort the credible from the non-credible every time we type a keyword into a search box

* So too are curators and archivists more needed than ever, now that we are all archiving and curating all the live-long day

GLAM and the Free World

Categories: Blogs

More hangry time for us......

Coal Trail - 2014, February 18 - 22:04


Yesterday, we had a good day at the hospital.  Bennett was able to eat and although it got a bit repetitive being confined to our isolation room we were able to pass the time playing games, making crafts and even went for a walk around the hospital.  Being that it was a stat holiday, there really were no developments on the medical front.  Bennett continues to feel well and his stool output has decreased again.
Today, it was back to normal at the hospital with all the team players at rounds.  We attended rounds this morning and tried to get a sense of all this craziness.Firstly, the transplant doctor was to meet with the GI docs later today to determine whether a scope was the best way to rule out Graft vs Host.  We should hear tomorrow what their recommendations are.  He did reduce Bennett’s anti-rejection drug by 25 %.  He does consider this risky as we are not 100% sure Bennett has no GvH.  But in reducing the anti-rejection it gives Ben some fight at bringing those high viral load numbers down.  
Secondly, the transplant doctor decided to make Ben NPO AGAIN?!?!?!  So nothing by mouth for the next 24-48 hours.  I won’t even tell you how awesome that has been today.
Thirdly, we really tried to learn as much as we could about this virus.  The adeno virus is a common cold/gastro virus that everyone has likely had once in their lifetime.  Because Ben has new immune system, it has never before seen this virus so really has no back up resources to fight it off.  His white blood cell counts, particularly his lymphocytes, are not as strong as they should be to fight off the virus.  Thus resulting in such a high viral load.  I was wrong with the 1.5 million.  It’s actually 1.29 million.  The doctors reiterated that they have never seen before someone with this high of a load doing as well as Bennett. A “normal” load is 0.  1000 is also not cause for concern.  So you can see why the doctors have their knickers in a knot about this.  They also reassured us that they don’t treat the number - but the patient.  But, at the same time, they need to be realistic about what could come. 
They did say that they were encouraged that this was happening 4 months after transplant.  We would already be on the highly toxic medication already if Bennett was less than 100 days after transplant.  What the doctors don’t know is how long his viral load has been this high, and if it is on its way up or down. They will repeat the blood test on Thursday, to see what the load is then.  If it’s on its way down...WOW.  If the number climbs then we move in to the medication phase.  The medication does not eliminate the virus from the body...that’s the beauty of viruses.  The medication simply stops the virus from replicating itself.  So, for example, if he should develop symptoms overnight there is no guarantee the medication would work because the virus would already be present in other organ systems.  At this point, the team agrees the medication is too toxic (it causes kidney failure) to administer until we see the new viral load numbers on Saturday.At the end of rounds, we told the doctors how baffled we are because Bennett is so healthy on the outside.  They cautioned us when we said that and it really sunk in for me that this is how Bennett continues to amaze us.  He always looks so great on the outside while his body is fighting so fiercely inside.
The positive part of the day is that they gave us an 8 hour pass to get out of our room.  We took Bennett home to see his sisters and his grandma that arrived from out of town.  He wasn’t in the best of moods....NPO awesomeness!!!  But, we did stop on the way back from the hospital at his cousins house and they had a short play that helped to distract Bennett from “his tummy that is speaking angrily to him” as he says!

Categories: Blogs

Go Ninjagos Go!

Coal Trail - 2014, February 16 - 22:10


Bennett has really sailed through his transplant journey.  We are so incredibly lucky that he really has had no major setbacks and has felt great most of the time.  It is not what we were expecting.  Part of that can be attributed to the low-dose chemotherapy he received during his conditioning regimen and the other part I believe is because he continues to sail through the worrisome obstacles that have been creeping up since mid-December.
I don’t know that I can say the same for Darren and I.  I really don’t feel like we are sailing through lately since...
....the kidney issues began in mid-December requiring a medication to protect his kidneys from his anti-rejection drug (cyclosporin)...the two weeks we waited for the chimerism results and then found out that he was 100 percent donor cells...the week when his EBV viral load was in the extremely high zone and the doctor prepared us for a potential diagnosis of lymphoma, only to find out 2 days later that the EBV viral load had fallen dramatically....the day he was prepped for a mouth biopsy and the surgeon said, “Let this kid eat, there is nothing to biopsy, Bennett must have scared the mouth lesions away!”
I just feel that lately there’s a lot of worry for the parents.  But, the saving grace is that there has also been week after week of PURE RELIEF......
and now there is the new worry this week....
Bennett was admitted back on Unit 1 on Friday.  His diarrhea was not improving.  He was retested for c. difficile.....NEGATIVE.  Great!  
He was still experiencing symptoms, but they began to improve.  Yesterday, for the first time in weeks he was not lethargic, he wanted to eat and he needed to be entertained.  We were feeling encouraged.  
The doctors figured that perhaps the adeno virus was still in his gut and causing the remaining diarrhea symptoms.  The GI doctors that were considering a scope on Friday, signed off on Bennett today and said, “He is doing great, there is no reason to believe this is Graft vs Host.”  AWESOME!  We started making plans to come home tomorrow.
And then tonight we were told that the adeno virus was found in Bennett’s blood.  The viral load is 1.5 million.  They told me that this is incredibly high.  But yet again, Bennett surprises us.  3 different doctors came in tonight to look at him.  They have never seen an immuno-compromised patient with such a high viral load who was bouncing off the walls in his room.
Adeno virus can cause respiratory infections (pneumonia, bronchitis), urinary tract infection, gastro (which Ben has/had), conjunctivitis.  For immuno-suppressed patients these complications are expected to be severe.  Bennett currently has none of these symptoms and the gastro symptoms have improved over the past 24 hours.  
Bennett’s team of doctors (which now includes transplant/oncology/gastro and infectious diseases) are already working hard on a “special access” medication (cidofovir) that would be needed to treat Bennett should these symptoms appear.  They actually said to me tonight “We need this medication on board should he crash in the coming days.”  Yes, crash....awesome choice of words.  This medication requires complicated paperwork and permission to be able to administer.  They contemplated starting him on the cidofovir (worth a look on google at the side effects) tonight, but decided the side effects of the medication vs the way he was presenting tonight didn’t warrant its use.  But, they are preparing to use it if they should need it, as it is proven to work in post BMT patients.  
The doctors are also reconsidering the scope to absolutely rule out underlying graft vs host.  With worsening symptoms of the adeno virus, the anti-rejection drug (cyclosporin/motor oil med) would be cut back significantly.  And before they can cut it back, they need to ensure there is absolutely no GVHD....
All of this worry and these preparations for just in case.....
Tonight, after the flurry of doctor visits in his room, Bennett wanted to know what was happening.  I explained to him that all the doctors THINK that he should be really sick, but that he wasn’t feeling really sick right now. He offered to me the following explanation.

  • So mom, it’s like there are good ninjas and bad ninjas in my body.
  • Yes, Bennett.  1.5 million bad ninjas to be exact.
  • Then I have 1.5 million gold ninjagos fighting them off.
  • Sounds good.
  • I know it’s going to be a good night tonight cause I can feel my gold ninjagos slicing the bad ninjas into 4 pieces.
  • Awesome, let’s go with that Ben.  Slice the heck out of them and keep surprising us like you have done every time in the last two months!!!!

Categories: Blogs

Sweet, Comic Valentine

Fighting the Dragons - 2014, February 14 - 20:28

Your looks are laughable
Unphotographable
Yet, you're my favourite
Work
Of art
It's been awhile so here's a quick breakdown of what's been happening:
Potty training? CheckBig girl bed (mattress on the floor)? CheckPreschool enrollment? CheckLong term follow-up (appointments every 3 months vs 4 weeks)? CheckSpeech and language catching up? Check
Happy Valentines Day!


Categories: Blogs

Day +135....And we're back on Unit 1

Coal Trail - 2014, February 14 - 18:07



We were discharged last Saturday, February 8.  Bennett was still having some diarrhea then, but the volume had decreased substantially so they were fine letting us go home.  Further testing determined that the C. diff had been resolved by the medication.  We enjoyed last Sunday off at home as we knew we would be traveling into Calgary every day this week for daily clinic visits.

Bennett continued feeling tired, very low energy and still had diarrhea (although a low volume) throughout the week.  Because of the medications he is taking and the loss of fluids in stooling, he requires 1500 ml of fluid a day.  We were having difficulty having him drink that much (because he felt so awful), so he received a fluid bolus everyday to help him reach the 1500 ml target.  

Throughout the week, his blood work began trending very low.  It is actually as low as it was in the first weeks after transplant.  On Wednesday, another test came back showing that Ben was over the C. Diff but now has adeno virus.  The doctors felt this could be causing the stooling, occasional vomiting and low blood numbers.  

On Thursday (02/13), his stool volumes increased substantially and today during his clinic visit he was admitted to unit 1 again.  The reason being, that it has been three weeks now and the doctors need to investigate further and rule out Graft vs Host.  He will have to fast again for 48 hours....just awesome!  It is the same rules as last time for the 48 hours.....decreased stooling, no biopsy......similar or increased stooling, biopsy.   It is a surgery and they scope Bennett’s entire digestive system to gather tissue so that they can analyze for a variety of viruses, bacteria, growths or graft vs. host.

So, to sum it up:  we feel as though we have taken 10 steps back.  Because Bennett is so immuno-compromised these simple viruses (like the one he currently carries - adeno virus), really take the steam out of him.  He has such limited resources to call on to fight off infection.  They have also drawn blood work to determine if the virus has now made its way into his blood system (accounting for the low numbers).  He did receive a dose of GCSF today to stimulate his bone marrow to produce more blood cells and hopefully bring up his counts.  He received GCSF daily for the first two weeks after transplant to stimulate his marrow.  It is uncommon to need it this far down the road!  The chimerism test (the one we were all nervous about in January) will also be repeated if this low trending blood counts continue.    

On a positive note (and perhaps rather ironic) - he seems to be feeling really well this afternoon.  He also happily hosted a Valentine Party for his sisters in his new hospital room.  I am being a bit sarcastic with the happily part.  He is such a neat kid....he planned a great V-Day party for his sisters earlier this week during one of our 6 hour long clinic visits this week.  We had a sneaking suspicion he would be admitted last night, so we packed the decorations and games with us this morning, so the party could happen anywhere.  We had the party.  But the not eating is really getting to him...and the “fun and games” wore him down quickly.

Please continue to send your thoughts, messages, texts, emails and phone calls.  We appreciate all of your support from near and far. 

Categories: Blogs

How Far Are We From Real Life RoboCops | The Sync Up

Belmont - 2014, February 11 - 18:55

On this episode of #TheSyncUp we talk about Real Life Robocops! Or, at least, the robots helping to protect us in the future… or end the world as we know it, depending on your outlook.?

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Categories: Blogs

NMR Data Evaluation: Review of Covariance Applications

NMR blog - 2014, February 10 - 17:00

Review of an important new NMR technique requiring special data evaluation.

Categories: Blogs

Day +130

Coal Trail - 2014, February 9 - 20:32

Bennett was discharged yesterday afternoon.  It was so great to have him come home.  Today, he spent the day watching the Olympics and making Valentine's cards with his sisters.  He is still very tired and weak from being in bed for the past 5 days.  He did well taking his medicines orally today which was awesome for us!  We really hope he is on the upswing and continues to recover throughout the week!

I've been meaning to post photos for the past few weeks - here is what we have been up to!

As previously mentioned, we have so much gratitude for so much in our lives...especially the rainbow loom.  Lucie is catching on quickly and trying to keep up to her brothers frantic pace of about 10 - 15 bracelets a day.  In can be tiring at times!


A couple of weeks ago, I had the amazing opportunity to play in the Kimmett Cup Pond hockey tournament in memory of Lindsay Kimmett.  It was a gorgeous January day, and the event raised $160,000 for the Children's Wish Foundation!

We have been so spoiled by frequent visits with our cousins at the ranch.  It really gives Bennett something to look forward to and he is able to forget about all the medical stuff going on!  Bennett still has to avoid crowds, public places and others homes.  His neutrophils and white blood counts are still very low so it does make visiting a bit of a novelty!

The one thing that the doctor's told Bennett he could do was to ski at COP (a ski hill about 10 minutes from the Children's Hospital), if he didn't go into the cafeteria or public washrooms.  In mid-January, he happily skied COP with Mike & Kate for an afternoon!

We've had a cold spell for the past couple of weeks.  When Bennett was home and not feeling well he loved sitting in front of the fire, listening to music.  He had me print off some lyrics and sang along...pretty awesome!

Passing time waiting on a clinic visit at the hospital.

Bennett's Uncle Davy is a physician with STARS.  They were in High River showing off their brand new helicopter.  Bennett was invited to watch it land, have a tour and watch it take off.  A definite highlight!

Lucie and Maeve have been taking some trampoline classes.  They both just love it.  Here is Lucie climbing the rope to the ceiling.  

We haven't taken many "medical pictures" of Bennett's hospital stays.  Here is an example of his iv/fluid lines.  His central line has 2 lumens - so 2 "ports of entry" for medications.  On the day he was admitted they had each lumen hooked up to 2 lines.  So he had 4 things going in at once at some points.  It was the same type of set up when he was undergoing chemo & transplant. 

When Bennett started to feel better he painted a volcano decorate his room.

Maeve has a special little friend that she can sometimes visit with at "Bennett's hospital".  

Categories: Blogs

How to investigate soft matter using Variable Field NMR Relaxometry

NMR blog - 2014, February 7 - 17:00

Slides of a Talk presented at a GIDRM Workshop in Bari (Italy).

Categories: Blogs